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Newspaper Extracts

This section contains a number of period newspaper extracts which you may find interesting.

Newspaper journalism during those days appears to be superior to that we endure now. The newspaper reports of life in the great sea port of Liverpool during Victorian times reveal some of the worst in human behaviour. However the same newspapers also highlight the best in folk, going about their lives that helped to make our country what it is today.

LIVERPOOL MERCURY NEWSPAPER
Friday 28th June 1868

NEWSHAM PARK – Destruction of Trees

County Magistrates Court

At that time work was being undertaken to get NEWSHAM PARK ready for a state opening. Grand houses were being built in and around the new parkland and were purchased by the some of the wealthiest members in British Society.

The new Liverpool Town Park Peelers were on duty now. Officers such as James GRAY and Thomas MAHON were no fools – The enforcement of the law and ensuring the safety of “Queen Victoria’s Subjects and the protection of their property” in and around the new town Parks was their role – and they did it well.

Maybe the first recorded arrest by the new Liverpool Park Peelers took place during late June of 1868 – a minor offence in reality, but showing a “Zero Tolerance’ application of the law by those early officers.

The Circumstances:-

Friday 28th JUNE 1868 a boy named RICHARD SHORT, aged twelve years, appeared before the Magistrates of the County Court.

The witness Town Park Keeper James GRAY stated that on the evening of the previous day, he was on patrol when he saw the prisoner leap over a fence and break a young tree recently planted in the park.

The prisoner ran away, but was pursued by GRAY and he took him into custody. In reply to the charge the prisoner said “He wanted the branch to make a handle for a hammer – with which he was going to do some work.”

The Magistrates were told that nothing was previously known against the prisoner’s character. He was discharged with a caution from Magistrates.

LIVERPOOL MERCURY NEWSPAPER
Thursday 29th March 1879

County Magistrates Court:
Assault on Town Park Keeper YATES.

Note:- An early example of the ‘Liverpool Town Park Peelers’ dealing with road traffic offenders.

The Circumstances:-

GEORGE MARSHALL and JAMES SALISBURY two carters were charged with having driven horse carts through SEFTON PARK, in contravention of the Parks bye–laws – and Assaulting Liverpool Town Park Keeper HENRY YATES in the execution of his duty.

Mr Gill Prosecuting for the Liverpool Town Corporation said:-

“That according to the bye–laws, no cart was allowed to go along the parks boulevards except for the purpose of conveying materials for the parks new buildings.”

YATES in evidence said – On the 10th March he noticed the defendants driving two horse drawn carts, loaded with building bricks through the park. He stopped the cart and took hold of SALISBURY’S horse – for the purpose of it going no further, SALISBURY then sized his arm and twisted it.

SALISBURY was fined 10 shillings for Assault on YATES. He was also fined the same amount for breach of the Parks Bye–laws. MARSHALL was fined 10 shilling and costs.

LIVERPOOL MERCURY NEWSPAPER
Tuesday 16th November 1880.

Liverpool Town had just become a City – the second City of the British Empire. The vast NEWSHAM and SEFTON PARKS were at that time positioned outside the town in Lancashire – the City was now expanding at a great pace and in doing so was engulfing the small Lancashire villages and townships.

COUNTY COURT CORONERS COURT

UNIDENTIFIED BODY – THE MYSTERIOUS DROWNING IN NEWSHAM PARK.

Yesterday at The George Hotel, Green Lane in Tuebrook before Mr C.E. Driffield the County Coroner – an investigation took place into the death of a man, at present unidentified aged about fifty years of age, whose body was found floating in the lake at Newsham Park on Friday.

The evidence rendered by Liverpool Town Park Keeper Thomas MAHON and Sergeant ROSSINEY of the County Constabulary stationed at Tuebrook Police Station, was to the effect that the body was found floating in the water at twenty minutes before seven o’ clock on Friday morning.

A line was thrown out and the body was hauled to the bank of the lake. It was found that the throat had been cut under the left ear to the middle of the chin, but no so to have severed the arteries. Upon searching the clothing Sergeant ROSSINEY found a razor in a half–case in the inside breast pocket of the deceased coat.

In other pockets in the clothing were found a pair of spectacles, a Vulcanite pocket comb in a case, with the word ‘Lewis’ stamped on the side, a pair of leather cuffs, a brown ribbed silk scarf, with the name ‘T.S.Moss’ stamped upon the back. A space corresponding to the name of some town being blank. The words having been washed out, probably during the period of immersion,

Also found – three unused post cards and an imitation diamond breast–pin. On the shirt was the date ‘1867’ and below that were indications of an inscription which had been cut recently – the edge of the cut being sharply defined.

There were no marks of any struggle in and around the area of the lake, which can he approached any time of the day or night, the roads adjoining the lake being public thorough fare from TUEBROOK to FAIRFIELD. They were of the opinion that the cut was done by a razor being found in the deceased pocket.

The clothing and effects of the deceased are in the possession of the County Constabulary at TUEBROOK Police Station, where all enquires will be promptly attended too.

THE LIVERPOOL MERCURY NEWSPAPER
THURSDAY 1st JANUARY 1880

News Year's Day

THE STRANGE CASE HEARD BEFORE THE COUNTY MAGISTRATES – including Mr G.H. Horsefall.

The charge and summons issued by County Constabulary was that:-

Liverpool Corporation Park Keeper Constables James WOODS stationed at STANLEY PARK – had not assisted COUNTY CONSTABLE number 891, when called upon to do in the apprehension of a man named WILSON.

The evidence was that the man named WILSON was in STANLEY PARK on Saturday last, being seen drunk and disorderly. COUNTY CONSTABLE 891 (name not mentioned) took him into custody and he became very violent – kicking and striking the officer.

A large crowd collected and the COUNTY CONSTABLE fearing he would be overpowered called to WOODS to assist him.

According to the COUNTY CONSTABLE – the CORPORATION PARK KEEPER named WOODS attempted to handcuff the drunk but could not do so. He then walked away and was again asked by for his assistance – but he declined saying “IT WAS NO BUSINESS OF HIS”

WOODS in evidence stated that he “DID ASSIST THE COUNTY CONSTABLE AND ONLY LEFT IN ORDER TO UNDERTAKE OTHER DUTIES” adding that there had been many people skating on the iced up lake – and several accidents had taken place – and one to a child had occurred.

The COUNTY MAGISTRATES were of the opinion that WOOD’S should have assisted the COUNTY CONSTABLE and asked the Clerk of the Court to bring the matter to the attention of the LIVERPOOL CORPORATION.

Note:- The Officer concerned was JAMES WOODS recorded serving in 1877. At that time STANLEY PARK was located in the County of Lancashire and not part of Liverpool. Such cross boundary jurisdiction matters and operational rivalry were common among policemen in those early days – even now in the UK that sort of rivalry remains very common and often impedes investigations.

THE LIVERPOOL MERCURY NEWSPAPER
FRIDAY 8th JULY 1881

Attempted Suicide

The sad case of an ATTEMPTED SUICIDE was mentioned and what took place at the GARSTON VILLAGE Petty Sessions Court the day previous.

Appearing before the Magistrates Mr G.H. Horsefall and Mr F Holling was a man named Thomas SUMMERS, aged about 40 years of whose residence is unknown at this time. He was charge with attempting to drown himself in NEWSHAM PARK.

It appeared that at or about 5.30 am Park Keeper Constable MERCER was on patrol that morning and noticed the prisoner’s movement– and interfered just as he got into the water.

The prisoner said to the officer “I WANT TO DROWN MYSELF AND I HAVE INTENDED TO SO FOR THREE WEEKS” adding “MY WIFE AND CHILDREN ARE DEAD AND I HAVE NO FRIENDS“

It is believed that the prisoner was at time a carriage car proprietor in Liverpool. He was remanded for a week in order that enquires might be made as to the truth of his statements and mental condition.

THE LIVERPOOL MERCURY NEWSPAPER
TUESDAY 11th MAY 1882

Before Magistrates Mr J.B. Smith and Mr F.B. Forward

COMMITED FOR INDECENT ASSAULT

A middle aged man named Daniel FELTON, who described himself as a Married man employed as Commercial Traveller and living at 34 Perth Street Manchester – was charged with having on Saturday of the previous week INDECENTLY ASSAULTED seven year old Emily BIRD in SEFTON PARK.

The unnamed PARK KEEPER CONSTABLE had noticed the prisoner playing with some girls in the park near too the Lark Lane entrance. The officer watched and saw the prisoner behave indecently towards the little girl.

A Barrister named Mr WALTON appeared for the prisoner and urged that the playing with the child and children was without any indecent intent.

After hearing the evidence of the Park Officer and the child involved – the case was proven and FELTON was given a months imprisonment with hard labour.

THE LIVERPOOL MERCURY NEWSPAPER
Tuesday 24th April 1883

CHILD MURDER IN STANLEY PARK

Yesterday Mr W.H. BARKER, the County Coroner held an inquest at The WALTON WORK HOUSE on the body of an infant apparently about three months old, which was found in the lake at STANLEY PARK on Friday – under circumstances which leave no doubt that it had been the victim of a most heartless murder.

Charles MOSS one of the gardeners at STANLEY PARK, deposed and said that at about 11 o’clock on Friday he noticed the body floating just under the surface of the water, in a secluded corner of the lake, where it was hidden by shrubbery from the observation of passers by. The water at this point is about 2 foot deep and the lake is fenced with railings.

He said it was floating feet upmost, the head being entangled in weeds. On getting it out of the lake he found a child’s shirt tired tightly by the corners around its neck. He gave information to the parks police and the body was taken to WALTON WORK HOUSE.

In answer to questions by the jury, witness said that the body could have floated to where it was found, as it was a quite still pool. Adding who ever dropped it into the lake must have got over the railings and clambered along and under the trees. It could not have been done from the footpath.

PARK POLICE SERGEANT MAHON deposed to convey the body to the mortuary. The clothing upon the body consisted of a flannel and a binder, besides the shirt which was tired around the neck.

Doctor ANDERSON said he had made a post–mortem examination. The body was that of a boy two or three months, fully develop and nurtured. In fact it was an unusually fine child. There was good deal of discolouration but no outward marks of violence. The body had apparently been in the water for four or five days. He attributed death to suffocation and thought the child was alive when put in the water. The organs were healthy and the death was undoubly due to violence.

The Jury recorded a verdict of “WILFUL MURDER” against person or persons unknown. The CORONER suggesting the offence of “INFANTICIDE” as it was becoming common.

The CORONER was also directed to bring this case to the attention of the HM HOME SECRETARY – with the view to a reward being offered for the discovery of the authors of the crime.

THE LIVERPOOL MERCURY NEWSPAPER
Tuesday 3rd July 1883

Magistrates Court before Mr Raffles.

WARNING TO PARENTS:-

A respectable man named DUNCAN Mc INTYRE described as a seaman was charged with INDECENTLY ASSAUTING a girl, aged eight years of respectable parentage – while in the towns WAVERTREE PARK on Friday afternoon the 29th JUNE 1883.

The prisoner before the court induced the little girl and her companion to go with him to BOTANIC PARK. After treating them to an ice cream and a penny each – he took them from the gates of the park to a quit part of the park.

PARK CONSTABLE CATTRALL on duty saw him and also saw him committing the offence – the details of which were of a revolting nature.

The prisoner was committed to the Sessions Court for trial.

THE LIVERPOOL MERCURY NEWSPAPER
Saturday 9th May 1884

Magistrates Court Friday 8th May 1884
Before Admiral Gough CB

A young man named JONES was sent to jail with hard labour for stealing a bungle of items including linen, collars and other items valued at 25 shillings.

The items were stolen from a girl named Fanny SMITH, who was walking through PRINCESS PARK when JONES snatched the bungle from her and ran off.

He was followed by Park Keeper Constable David FURGUSON and was taken into custody.

A young man named as William MC QUEEN assisted FURGUSON – both men received awards for their activities.

THE LIVERPOOL MERCURY NEWSPAPER
Thursday 21st June 1884

COUNTY COURT WALTON
Before Lieutenant Colonel BIDWELL and Messrs W ROBERTS

MISCONDUCT IN STANLEY PARK

George THOM – a cotton porter charged and appeared for “BEHAVING INDECENTLY” to two little girls in STANLEY PARK.

In reply to THE BENCH questions – one of the PARK KEEPER CONSTABLES stated that there were not an adequate number of officers employed to watch the park efficiently, as to prevent occurrences similar to the one that the court had just enquired into.

THE LIVERPOOL MERCURY NEWSPAPER
Monday 14th July 1884

ATTEMPTED SUICIDE

COUNTY MAGISTRATES COURT

Today before Mr Hugh PERKINS and Mr H.B. GILMORE appeared an elderly man named Thomas BULMAN, charged with ATTEMPTING to COMMIT SUICIDE – by cutting his throat with razor while in STANLEY PARK on the 25th of last month.

On that day Park Keeper Constable James OLIVER was on patrol when he received information. He went to a location in the centre of the park and found the prisoner lying on his back. He saw that he was bleeding from a wound on his throat and an open razor was at his side. Dr McDONALD from nearby SPELLOW LANE was sent for and he dressed and confronted the man’s wounds. He was then taken to STANLEY HOSPITAL.

A married daughter of the prisoner SARAH GOODENOUGH stated that her father had been a labourer in the employ of the Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway Company until sixteen months ago, when he was discharged unfit for work. He did not drink and had been depressed.

She offered the court that she would take care of the prisoner – This was refused.

The Magistrates remanded the prisoner for a week in order that medical evidence can be obtained.

THE LIVERPOOL MERCURY NEWSPAPER
Monday 10th AUGUST 1885

SATURDAY AUGUST 4th 1885
County Magistrates Court:
Before Sir Thomas BROCKLEBANK and Mr C LANGTON

ASSAULTING A PARK KEEPER

A man of respectable appearance named William TISDALE was summonsed for assault on Officer Samuel McELROY at NEWSHAM PARK.

On Monday last Park Keeper Constable MAHON asked the defendant to desist from pulling weeds out of the parks lake and strewing them about.

The defendant TISDALE said he would not stop even if the LIVERPOOL CORPORATION wished him to do so. He was then asked for his name and address by Keeper Mc EVOY which he refused to give. He then struck Mc ELROY with a hooked pole with which he had been pulling the weeds out of the lake.

Fined ten shillings with court costs, with the alternative of 14 days imprisonment.

THE LIVERPOOL MERCURY NEWSPAPER
Wednesday 19th May 1886

PUBLIC PARK PEST

A William JOINER a brass finisher of Chatsworth Street charged with INDECENT CONDUCT towards two little girls.

The suspicions of Park Keeper Constable Benjamin CATTRALL were aroused by the movements of the prisoner. After close observations the officer laid on him, under circumstances which left no doubt of his intentions.

The prisoner was handed in charge to Constable 947.

He was fined forty shillings with cost, in default a month’s imprisonment.

COMMENTS FOLLOWED IN THE PRESS:-

“THE PUBLIC PARKS ARE MORE OR LESS INFESTED WITH PESTS OF THIS SORT AND THE VIGILANCE OF CATTRALL AND THE TOWN KEEPERS IS MUCH COMMENDED”.

THE LIVERPOOL MERCURY NEWSPAPER
Tuesday 27th July 1886

PUBLIC PARK PEST

A man named as John McDERMOND lodging at No 8 Hunter Street was yesterday sentenced by the Deputy Stipenary Magistrate to three months imprisonment with hard labour for an offence against a little girl in WAVERTREE PARK.

The case was proven by Park Keeper Constable Benjamin CATTRALL and CITY CONSTABLE 828.

At the same court John McGAIN a CITY CONSTABLE appeared for being DRUNK and DISORDERLEY – and assaulting Inspector GODKIN of the CITY POLICE.

McGAIN was found guilty and fined forty shillings for being drunk. The case of assault on Inspector GODKIN was dismissed.

THE LIVERPOOL MERCURY NEWSPAPER
Thursday 20th MAY 1886

Before Mr Raffles and Admiral Gooch alongside Alderman Chambers. Liverpool Police Courts.

PUBLIC PARK PEST

A man named Owen MURPHY was found 20 shillings, in default 14 days imprisonment for OFFENSIVE CONDUCT at WAVERTREE PARK.

The charge was proved by Park Keeper Constable CATTRALL.

THE SAME DAY AND COURT:

Assault on MARKET CONSTABLES James McKINLEY and Daniel McALLISTER.

James COLLINS – Guilty of being drunk and assaulting MARKET CONSTABLES who had ordered him to leave ST JOHNS MARKET. He then turned around and kicked the Constables. He was then taken to Jordan Street Bridewell.

Found guilty – jailed for 2 months.

THE LIVERPOOL MERCURY NEWSPAPER
Saturday July 23rd 1887

Liverpool Police Court Friday 22nd July 1887
Before Magistrates Mr A. Billion and Mr B. Smith

PARK NUISANCE

A man named William HOMES aged 24 years and a woman named Isabel CAIN were each fined ten shillings and court costs. They were charged with INDECENT BEHAVIOUR while in WAVERTREE PARK.

The prosecution case proved with the evidence of Park Keeper Constable Benjamin CATTRALL.

THE LIVERPOOL MERCURY NEWSPAPER
Thursday September 29th 1887

Before Messrs Mr John Henderson and David Hughes.

Serious Offence in WAVERTREE PARK on Wednesday 28th September 1887.

A middle aged man named George WALTERS of a respectable appearance, described as the Head Ported at the University College, was charged with INDECENTLY EXPOSING himself to two little girls.

WALTERS was arrested by Park Keeper Constable Benjamin CATTRALL and handed in charge to City Constable 811. When WALTERS was charged he said “I DENY IT ENTIRELY“.

The children having given evidence – the prisoner said he went to WAVERTREE PARK and saw the children – adding that when in the park he never saw the CONSTABLE till he stopped him BOTANIC ROAD.

For the prisoner Mr HATTLEY stated that the prisoner was a married man, had been a Sergeant Major in the Army and held a very good character. A Doctor LONDINI was called as to his character and said he was a married man and had been employed by the City University Collage as the Head Porter. He had good references from his Colonel and two clergymen.

The bench understood that case was being undertaken under a “Local Act” which gave The Bench only the power to impose a ‘fine’ – but Mr Henderson the Magistrate said that they had most carefully considered the matter, but they felt the offence was too serious to be dealt with by a fine.

LIVERPOOL ECHO NEWSPAPER
January 7th 1889

County Sessions Police Courts Islington this morning;
Magistrates Messrs J Barkey SMITH and William LEES

ROWDY CONDUCT AT NEWSHAM PARK

The following appeared William FORSHAW – an Artist of Landser Road and Charles Gregory ROBERTS , Bookbinder of 72 Esmond Street off Belmont Road, appeared for charges of:-

“INSULTING AND DISORDERLEY BEHAVIOUR in NEWSHAM PARK”

Mr PICKMERE appeared on behalf of the “CORPORATION OF LIVERPOOL” to support the information’s and after putting in a copy of the Parks bye–laws stated that the defendants with others had gone to NEWSHAM PARK on the 30th of last month and created a disturbance to the annoyance of people frequenting the park.

They went ‘ARM IN ARM’ running along one of the footpaths, shouting and singing, preventing people from passing.

The ‘CORPORATION’ had already taken action in this matter, and for some time there had been no great annoyance, but lately this had resumed again and the ‘CORPORATION’ and the PARK CONSTABLES KEEPERS found the only course was to bring the offenders before the Magistrates.

Park Keeper Constable LUNT stated that on the date mentioned he and another Keeper heard a number of women screaming and shouting, thinking something was seriously wrong they went to see what the matter was.

Near the Round Pond they found between thirty and forty people, young men and women – the foot path being completely blocked so they could neither walk one way or the other.

The ‘Defendants’ – who appeared to be the worst of the number were jostling those people about and were eventually taken into custody.

FORSHAW was very disorderly and gave a false address. – He was fined five shillings with the courts cost. ROBERTS was let off with a ‘caution’ from the Magistrates.

THE LIVERPOOL MERCURY NEWSPAPER
Saturday 21st September 1889

A PARK PEST:

John SMITH, who gave his address as Ambrose Street charged with ASSAULTING a girl in WAVERTREE PARK.

The charge was proven by Park Keeper Constable Benjamin CATTRALL – SMITH was fined twenty shillings, in default 14 days hard labour.

LIVERPOOL SHIPWRECK AND HUMANE SOCIETY AWARD
29th AUGUST 1889

“20 shillings awarded and repairs to his watch to Park Keeper Constable William DAWSON for having gone into a deep part of the Lake at Princess Park and rescuing two children from being drowned.”

THE LIVERPOOL MERCURY NEWSPAPER
Monday 16th June 1890

PARK PEST

Edward HEDLEY, who gave his address as BOALER STREET was charged with INDECENT BEHAVIOUR in WAVERTREE PARK on TUESDAY evening.

The prisoner was arrested that evening by Park Keeper Constable Benjamin CATTRALL who caught him in the act of committing the offence.

The prisoner pleaded “Guilty” to the change – ordered to pay a fine of forty shillings or a month’s hard labour.

THE LIVERPOOL MERCURY NEWSPAPER
Tuesday 8th DECEMBER 1891

CORONERS INQUEST:
Before Mr S Brighouse Coroner St George Hotel Tuebrook, near Liverpool

Body of unknown man found on SATURDAY lying dead in the lake at NEWSHAM PARK.

The body was found by Park Keeper Constable WIGLESWORTH in about four feet of water, some ten yards from the side.

The man was aged about forty, height 5 feet 6 and a half inches. Fresh complexion, brown hair and light brown whiskers.

THE LIVERPOOL MERCURY NEWSPAPER
Tuesday 22nd May 1894

SHOCKING SUICIDE IN A POLICE STATION

A suicide of a determined character took place at the COUNTY CONSTABULARY POLICE STATION in LARK LANE.

Soon after four o’clock William CRAIG, 46 years of age, a warehouse man living at number 64 DOMBY STREET was brought to the station by PARK KEEPER CONSTABLE John GRAY one of the officers from SEFTON PARK

The officer brought GRAY to the station as he appeared DRUNK – and at his own request CRAIG spoke to the INSPECTOR in charge saying he wanted protection. A CONSTABLE was sent to his residence to inform his relatives of his whereabouts.

CONSTABLE PETER’S was engaged writing at his desk when he heard a peculiar noise. Turning around he saw GRAIG in the act of cutting his throat with a pocket knife. PETER’S rushed to the man and wrestled the knife from him and held the wound – however GRAIG died before the arrival of Doctor TAPLIN.

THE LIVERPOOL MERCURY NEWSPAPER
Monday 30th September 1895

COUNTY MAGISTRATES COURTS:
Before Messrs John Stone, C.H. Giles,
E.J. Grimshaw and T.T. Rogers

CAUGHT IN THE ACT

A young man named John SMITH was charged with attempting to break into the house of William ASHCROFT, Cashier of DENMAN DRIVE in NEWSHAM PARK

Evidence given by Park Keeper Constable LUNT to the effect that about 5 o clock the previous morning he saw the prisoner come out of STRATHMARE ROAD in NEWSHAM PARK. He followed him observing him enter two other gardens in the same street. He then went into the garden of number 11 DENMAN DRIVE, where he got on a rockery and tried to open a window, but on seeing the witness he attempted to run off – but was caught by LUNT.

At the Police Station he denied that he had attempted to enter the house. A large bar was found in his possession. Several previous convictions against the prisoner had been recorded.

It appeared that he had only come out of prison the previous day. He was committed for three months with hard labour.

THE LIVERPOOL MERCURY NEWSPAPER
Tuesday 23rd May 1899

LIVERPOOL and DISTRICT POLICE COURT:
Before Mr J.Stewart the Stipendiary Magistrate.

A respectably dressed young man named Thomas BELLIS, from MANCHESTER was charged with wilfully damaging plants at BOTANIC GARDENS and Assaulting Park Keeper Constable Benjamin CATTRALL.

Witness John DEARY, Gardener at BOTANIC GARDENS, employed by the LIVERPOOL CORPORATION gave evidence.

He said that on the Bank Holiday the prisoner was in one of the GREEN HOUSES and was observed to break off a flower from one of the plants. Witness then spoke to him about it and told him he had no right to do so.

According to DEARY’s statement the prisoners reply to me was “A BLOW TO THE FACE”.

Subsequently BELLIS assaulted CATTRALL – who arrested him and took him into custody.

BELLIS denied the charge of breaking the plant and wilful damage. He admitted the assault on CATTRALL, however in excuse he objected to being hassled and being pushed around for nothing.

He was fined five shillings imposed for “Wilful Damage“ and five shillings for the Assault on CATTRALL.

THE LIVERPOOL MERCURY NEWSPAPER
Wednesday 24th May 1899

THE NEWSHAM PARK MYSTERY
THE BODY OF A FEMALE CHILD

Before the Coroner Mr T.E. SAMPSON in Liverpool Dale Street Police Station Building:

Park Keeper Constable LUNT deposed to finding the naked child’s body in the lake at NEWSHAM PARK on SATURDAY last.

He recovered from the lake a cardboard box which was tired together with some string. The body was removed to the Tuebrook Dead House by City CONSTABLE John BELL.

Detective CROSS stated he had made enquires, but could find no trace likely to lead to the discovery of the mother of the child.

Doctor CORNETT said that death was due to unattention at birth – the body was much decomposed.

VERDICT – was returned by the jury in accordance with the doctor’s evidence.

e-mail: info@liverpoolparkspolice.co.uk

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